Category Archives: POV

Cassandra Rose Clark — Star’s End

Star’s End is the ultimate in corporate control. A science fiction story about the Four Sisters, four planets terraformed by Phillip Coromina. He not only owns the planets, he owns the people who inhabit them. Any person who doesn’t follow company rules disappears. Exiled or killed? The family business manufactures weapons. One product of the company is manufactured humans who are programmed in their DNA to be soldiers. They fight wars across the galaxy alongside normal human mercenaries hired by the corporations.  The manufactured soldiers are programmed to be loyal to each other and the corporations.

The protagonist in Star’s End is Phillip’s oldest daughter, Esme. Her mother is a soldier who left her to be raised by Phillip when she was born. Esme’s three-hundred-year-old father is dying. He has a disease which kills even those taking rejuvenation treatments. She is taken by surprise, but she has been waiting a long time. Esme will become CEO of Coromina Group. She wants to change the path of the company and no longer manufacture weapons.

There are also aliens living on the planets. Philip isolated them long ago and they have no contact with the humans. Sounds familiar, doesn’t it? Fear the aliens; fear anyone different from you instead of learning to live together; creating wars for profit.

Esme’s three younger half-sisters have all disappeared. She is trying to track them down and bring them home before her father dies. Each sister chose to leave when they found out how cruel their father was and what he had done to Isabel, the youngest. But Esme has stayed to work from inside to improve the system.

The novel jumps between present and past. The past POV is Esme, first person past, and the present is Esme, third person past. There are many secrets that we don’t learn until events occur in the past chapters or until Esme reaches a level in the corporation to learn them. Phillip is all about secrets. You are privy to more of what’s happening as you go up the ranks of the company. At the end of the story, Esme is one of the few Ninety-Nines, the highest level who can know all the secrets.

An interesting novel, obviously anti-corporate. I enjoyed it, even if I found Esme reluctantly following her father’s orders hard to take.

Annalee Newitz — Atonomous

This novel is speculative or science fiction; exploring robotics, pharmaceuticals, biotech, and artificial intelligence. The characters and POV include a human biotech pirate, an “indentured” human, a free robot scientist, an indentured android, other humans and bots. Newitz does a good job of getting into the “minds” of the bots as well as the humans.

Many underlying themes weave through this story—property rights, patents, pharmaceuticals, indenture/slavery, what is human. The plot revolves around the female biotech pirate, Jack, reverse-engineering a drug the makes people love their work. The patented version is very expensive and only available to the rich. Her version is cheap and available. It’s very addictive and some people work themselves to death or cause catastrophes that kill others. She goes to work finding a cure.

Other characters are Eliasz, human, and his indentured robotic partner, Paladin, who are working for Big Pharma tracking the pirate. Jack rescues and frees an indentured human. An autonomous robot comes into the story, working with Jack on the cure. Other characters, mostly from Jack’s past, pass through.

I enjoyed the ideas about our future more than the main plot of the story. I also liked the various points of view. Newitz did well poking into the thoughts of robots.

Amy Gentry — Good as Gone

Thirteen-year-old Julie is abducted from her home in the middle of the night as her ten-year-old sister Jane looks on in fear from the closet. Eight years later, Julie shows up at her family’s door. That’s the beginning and the end of two stories. The current story moves forward through mother Anna’s eyes as she begins to doubt that the girl who appeared on her doorstep is her daughter. And the story of Julie moves backward through the eight years as Julie takes on one persona then another to the time when she left her home.

This thriller is about the two women and how they deal with tragedy. A mother who drinks and hides from life, ignoring the daughter and husband who are still with her, cannot except that the returning daughter is lying and might not be who she says. The daughter who does whatever it takes to survive—changing names and life stories as she moves from one situation to another— is always running, always lying to herself as well as others.

As a writer, I found the point of view (POV) in this novel interesting, The Prologue is the only place the author uses sister Jane’s POV—third person past. In Chapter 1 we jump to the mother Anna’s POV—first person present. When the story shifts to Julie and her various role’s POV it’s third person past, until the last part of the book where it’s Julie’s POV—first person past. It sounds confusing but it works.

The book grabbed my attention and held it to the end.

J. D. Robb — Apprentice in Death

This review is more about the author (J. D. Robb, aka Nora Roberts) and her writing style than the story. First, let me say I am in awe of a woman who can publish over 200 novels in 36 years. That’s an average of almost six a year. And she writes well!

I haven’t read a book from the “in Death” series for many years. Long enough that I wasn’t at all familiar with the series protagonist, Lieutenant Eve Dallas. I imagine she’s changed over the years. In this story, she is a driven, very smart cop. She was in control of the investigation from beginning to end. She kept everyone moving in the right direction. She is also in a loving relationship with her husband, Roarke. He is rich, brilliant, and of course handsome. He treats her unbelievably well, and he even helps with the case with his money, ideas, and inventions. But Robb pulls this off without making it feel “over the top.”

This is a crime novel or a police procedural, and you know who the villains are very early.  But tracking them and preventing more killings keep the pace hard and fast. The author doesn’t let you pause for breath except for a few short breaks with Dallas and Roarke at home.

Two things about the writing were strange to me. First is the point of view. Robb uses omniscient POV. She knows what everyone is thinking…more or less. At times she seems to be using third person for long passages, especially with Dallas. Other times she switches back and forth rapidly between characters. This would normally drive me crazy. But Robb does it almost seamlessly.

The second strange idea in the novel is the time frame, 2061. True there are some tools, weapons, etc. that don’t exist today. But the story could be written in today’s world losing nothing. If I were to pick a time without knowing the date, I would guess ten years from now. Many of the special tools are available now or will be in a few years. Transportation was strange. Even in 2061, they weren’t using self-driving vehicles. The one thing we probably won’t have soon is off-planet prisons.

I enjoyed Apprentice in Death. It kept my attention, I liked all the characters, and the setting brought me back to New York City. Mainly, it was a good story. I’ll probably go back and read some of the previous books in the series.

Robert Crais — The Promise

Elvis Cole and Joe Pike are PI partners in LA that Robert Crais has been writing about through a long series of novels. Cole is a somewhat flaky, flippant character with a hard core and a good heart. Pike is a tough, silent ex-marine. In this story Jon Stone, a black-ops contractor and friend of Pike’s, joins them. The three of them are out to save a woman from herself who is seeking revenge for the death of her son.

Hard-bitten characters fill the novel. Most are not what or whom they appear to be when we meet them. But my favorite characters in this story are LAPD K-9 cop, Scott James, and his German Shepard partner, Maggie. Crais writes in multiple points of view, including the bad guys. He even gives us Maggie’s POV and does it very well. He doesn’t try to make her human. I’m planning to read The Suspect, which is Crais’ previous book about Scott and Maggie.

Crais wrote for television before he began to publish crime novels and has won many awards for his writing. He’s one of my favorite authors.

Alexander McCall Smith — The Woman Who Walked in Sunshine

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The author has a unique voice and style of writing. The pace is pleasant and meandering through the heat of Botswana in southern Africa. This is the latest in the series about The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency.

His main character, Precious Ramotswe, owner of the detective agency, wanders through the story with her mind drifting to related and totally unrelated subjects from whatever problem she is trying to solve. She is a big, warm-hearted woman who is always concerned with doing the right thing for her clients, her friends, her employees, her husband, and most anyone she meets.

In this novel, Mma Ramotswe has been persuaded to take her first vacation since she started her business. She is leaving the agency in the hands of her partner, Mma Makutsi. She is concerned about how the office will be run while she is away and not enjoying her vacation. She encounters a young boy on the streets of Gaborone and feels obliged to help him. Then Mr. Polopetsi, a school teacher who works part-time for her agency, asks her for help with a new client. She doesn’t want to interfere with her partner and how she is running the business, but ends up helping. She may not be going into the office, but she is not on vacation.

The setting is wonderful. I can feel the dry heat of the land, can almost smell the cattle when Precious goes into the country. The author captures the culture of Botswana. I can visualize the people in the streets of Gaborone.

The point-of-view is different. It is mostly third-person subjective from Precious’ viewpoint. But when she is in conversation with other characters we are sometimes privy to their thoughts as well.

Alexander McCall Smith’s writing is slow-paced, scattered, and delightful at the same time. I normally read books that are fast-paced thrillers. His writing is a pleasing change of pace.

The Unreliable Narrator

Definition: An unreliable narrator is a narrator, whether in literature, film, or theatre, whose credibility has been seriously compromised.
The term was coined in 1961 by Wayne C. Booth in The Rhetoric of Fiction.

The term unreliable narrator came to my attention recently when I was reading reviews of The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins. I turns out that the novel has three first-person unreliable narrators. Rachel (the girl on the train) imagines the lives of people she is watching from the train window every day. She is an alcoholic who suffers blackouts. She fills the blanks with what other people tell her, in particular, her ex-husband, Tom. Megan is a woman she has been watching. Rachel has invented a perfect life for her. Megan has a terrible past that she hides from the world, her husband, and even at times from herself. Anna is married to Tom and pretends their life is wonderful if Rachel would just stay out of their lives. Tom, who is not a narrator, lies to everyone.

Megan disappears and Rachel involves herself in the investigation to find out what happened to the perfect woman she has created in her mind. The plot is complex and we are led down many wrong paths through the unreliable narrators.

The next novel I read, The Invisible Ones by Stef Penney (British), also had two first-person narrators. (I happen to prefer first-person POV.) I read somewhere that any first-person point of view in a novel is likely an unreliable narrator. Keeping this in mind, I looked at the story in a slightly different way. Ray, the main character, is a half-Gypsy private investigator looking for woman who has been missing for eight years. JJ is a teenager living with family in the Gypsy site from which the woman disappeared. Ray is looking into a way of life he doesn’t truly understand and hearing different versions of the story of when and how the woman disappeared. JJ is only getting bits and pieces, excluded from conversations because he is a child. He uses his wild imagination to fill in the blanks. So, both Ray and JJ are unreliable narrators.

Next I read In Some Other World, Maybe by Shari Goldhagen. This novel is written in third person (sometimes second person) with multiple narrators. It is a complex story of intertwining lives. Each character has a different perspective on the same events. So I found that even though this story isn’t told in first person, it is told by unreliable narrators. Maybe every story has them in order to keep the plot interesting.

All three of the above mentioned novels are intriguing reads.

I believe my first novel, The Janus Code by J.C. Ferguson, has an unreliable narrator. It is written with a one third-person POV. I haven’t given much thought to the reliability of Ernie Pratt (first person, one narrator) in Mangrove Madness, my second novel. But maybe I will keep it in mind as I work on the sequel.

S. J. Gazan – The Arc of the Swallow

I like reading authors from other countries. It gives me a glimpse into unfamiliar cultures and settings. Of course, some of them are good and some are not, like writers anywhere. Gazan, from Denmark, is one of the good ones. His style is different than what I’m used to, whether that is because he is Danish, or just his personal style. His pace is slower and he covers more detail than many of the US authors I’ve read recently.

Gazan weaves a story with multiple points of view and multiple timelines, jumping back and forth in time to cover a different POV of the same event. Marie Skow, PhD candidate in biology, is faced with two apparent suicides: her mother and her professor and mentor, Kristian Storm. Police detective Soren Marhaunge is not only connected to Skow because of the suicides, but finds that they were neighbors as children. There are other POVs, woven through past and present, family, friends, and colleagues. Gazan even feeds us part of the story through deceased Dr. Storm.

It is an interesting and complex mystery and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

Matthew Quick — Love May Fail

This book is interesting to me as a writer because it is character driven with multiple first person point of view (POV). Very unusual. I tried writing a novel that way, years ago, but it didn’t work too well. Maybe I’ll try it again.

Each section of the book is a different POV, returning to the first POV for the last section.

First we meet Portia Kane (first POV), a woman leaving a twenty-year, unhappy marriage. She returns to her hometown where she hears that her high school teacher, Nate Vernon (second POV) —“Mr. Vernon,” Portia’s mentor— has left teaching and disappeared after being beaten by a student. She searches for him, wanting to save him and bring him back to teaching.

She crosses paths with Chuck Bass (third POV), who was also a student of the same teacher. He carries a card Mr. Vernon gave his students on the last day of his class, which reads “Official Member of the Human Race.” Chuck is a recovered drug addict who has turned his life around and is studying to be a teacher.

There is even a fourth POV slipped in between Nate Vernon and Chuck Bass. The late Sister Mauve Smith’s section is written in the form of letters to her son, Nate.

The story is full of coincidences or “God’s will” as Sister Mauve calls them. It was a good read, although I almost didn’t finish it after the first chapter.