Category Archives: mystery

Linwood Barclay — Elevator Pitch

Elevator Pitch is the first novel I’ve read by Linwood Barclay. I found the plot intriguing. Why would anyone kill people by messing with elevators? Is it just to terrorize the people of New York, one of the most vertical cities in the world? I predicted the villain early in the story but was led astray a few times before my guess was confirmed at the end. But I never guessed the “why” until revealed at the conclusion.

Barclay’s character portrayals are varied and interesting; the main ones are a reporter with an ax to grind, her daughter, two NYC police detectives, the mayor of New York, his son, and his “I take care of everything” staff member.

Although the book kept my interest throughout, it could use some editing, and it could lose about 200 pages. Lots of unneeded detail slowed the pace in the middle. I have a habit of skipping to the last few chapters of a book when I get bored, but this one kept my interest enough to keep me from doing that. I read all 600 plus pages.

I will look for more of Barclay’s writing.

Ann Cleeves — The Long Call

A police procedural mystery with beautiful coastal England settings and a mix of interesting characters.

The plot includes the murder of an apparently homeless man and two kidnappings of Down syndrome women. Detective Matthew Venn believes they are somehow related. All the victims have connections to his husband Jonathon’s service center, The Woodyard, which houses an artist’s colony, a counseling service, and a center for the learning disabled.

The author’s characters are varied and usually believable. But I found DI Venn a bit too insecure for a detective leading a murder investigation. His constable, Jenn Rafferty, is lively and smart. Ross, another member of Venn’s team, is young and impatient.

Cleeves’s description of North Devon brings to life the sights, smell, and sounds of the villages, countryside, and the coastline.

The story held my interest throughout. The pace is somewhat slow in the middle but interesting enough to keep me reading. It picks up toward the end.

The Long Call is the second novel I’ve read by Ann Cleeves. I’ll look for more of her books.

Erin Morgetstern — The Starless Sea

The Starless Sea is a story about the love of stories.

The main plot lies mostly underground in a world filled with stories—in books and paintings and sculptures and even in people. Zachary Ezra Rawlings finds an uncatalogued book with no listed author in the library. The book contains a story about him when as a young boy he missed the opportunity of opening a door painted on a wall. But the book is older than Zachary. How could the author know his story? His search for the source of the book leads him to the labyrinth of stories lying under his feet.

Morgenstern’s novel is filled with unrelated stories, fables, fairytales, and myths that intertwine and finally connect at the end of the book. These individual stories contain romance, loss, time and fate, humor…

I’m not usually a fan of fantasy, but I was absorbed in this book and Morgenstern’s excellent writing. She has a fantastic imagination.

Lisa Unger — The Stranger Inside

A character-driven psychological thriller, this novel grabs your attention and keeps it to the end.

Three children meet a monster in the woods—a huge, mean man with a huge, mean dog. Rain fights off man and dog, runs, and hides in the roots of a tree. Physically injured and traumatized, she stays hidden for hours, unable to move, call out, or go for help. Her two friends, Hank and Tess are dragged away by the monster. Hank is brutalized but survives. Tess doesn’t make it.

The story follows Rain and Hank as adults. Rain is a journalist who has quit her job to be a stay-at-home wife and mother, and Hank is a psychologist who treats traumatized children. Both lead fairly normal lives but carry scars from their childhood abduction and loss of their friend. Rain has a loving husband and a beautiful daughter that she adores. Hank is a kind and gentle doctor helping his patients. But Rain carries heavy guilt about not going for help to save her friends, and Hank has a second personality, cruel and vindictive. Both Hank and Rain become involved in the investigation of an apparent vigilante serial killer whose first victim may have been their abductor. Enough of the plot. Any more would be a spoiler.

Unger’s character development makes this book outstanding. She covers the two main characters in depth, good and bad. Unlike many books I’ve read recently, their personalities, although warped, are believable and held my interest from beginning to end.

Candice Fox — Fall

An angry serial killer is loose, killing beautiful female runners in the parks of Sydney Australia. In this third novel of Fox’s series about police partners Frank Bennett and Eden Archer, I learned more about Eden’s background and her vigilantism. Fox also focuses on Hookey, a teen who is helping the police with her technical skills.

Eden and Archer spend more time together in this book. It’s a bit hard to understand their relationship. Sometimes there’s between them and other times distrust and even fear. All of the characters are twisted and broken.

I enjoyed Fall more than the second book, Eden. The plot was less convoluted. The killer was not a surprise, but there was a major twist at the end.

Candice Fox — Eden

This mystery/thriller/crime novel takes place in the underbelly of Sydney, Australia. The author creates unique descriptions of places and characters, even the minor ones. A dark story filled with dark people—addicts, prostitutes, gangsters, killers, corrupt cops, and more. The second book in a series, I didn’t feel I missed anything by not reading the first, Hades.

Three girls have gone missing, and police detective Eden goes undercover to a farm where all three have lived at different times. Her partner Frank gets involved in a side job for Eden’s father, Hades, to identify a stalker and to solve an old cold case of a missing woman.

Although grim, the story kept my attention to the end. I was surprised by the ending.

Good writing.

Candice Fox — Redemption Point

Fox writes a dark, twisted murder mystery filled with convoluted characters.

Ex-police officer turned PI, Ted Conkaffey, has moved north from Sydney to a small town in the Australian rainforest trying to hide from his past. Although innocent and never prosecuted due to lack of evidence, accusations of child rape plastered his name and face all over the news and the internet and completely disrupted his life—lost job, broken marriage, strangers who react to his familiar face. He lives with a family of geese that he brought into his yard to rescue from the crocodiles.

Ted’s partner, Amanda Pharrell, has no emotions, but strangely possesses the ability to read other people. When she was a teenager, she accidentally killed a girl and spent time in prison, which she refers to as the best time of her life. She’s an upbeat, smiling personality who rides her bike everywhere, refusing to drive a car.

Pip Sweeney, on her first assignment as Detective Inspector, hooks up with Ted and Amanda to investigate the murder of two young people at a rundown bar. She’s fascinated by Amanda. Pip carries guilt from when, as a child, she sat and watched her father die of a heart attack and did nothing to save him. She’s young and naïve and relies heavily on Amanda’s quirky insights.

The author adds excerpts from the diary of the perpetrator of the crime of which Conkaffey was accused. Another weird character, sick and twisted.

There are other off-beat minor characters—the father of the raped girl, who comes after Ted, then turns to looking for the real offender; the owner of the bar where the two bartenders were killed; a crime kingpin in Sydney; some of the neighbors around the bar; the girlfriend of the young man murdered in the bar. Almost every character is quirky, strange, or dark.

This second book in a series about Ted and Amanda covered the previous story thoroughly enough that I don’t feel I need to go back and read it. The plot kept my interest, there was even some humor here and there, and the setting in the rainforest felt real. But I didn’t connect at all with the scenes in Sydney; I couldn’t picture the city. The weird characters kept me reading. Definitely a character-driven book.

Robert Dugoni — A Steep Price

A good police story. Seattle’s violent crimes unit has a lot going on. A missing East Indian woman may only be avoiding friends and family to dodge arranged marriage, but Tracy thinks it doesn’t feel right. Faz and Del investigate a shooting of a black woman activist in broad daylight, which they believe was ordered by the local drug kingpin. A suspect of the woman’s shooting is shot and killed by Gonzalez, a new detective in the department from LA. The suspect was unarmed.

All of the detectives have pressures on the personal side. Tracy is pregnant but hasn’t told her department. Faz’s wife Vera is diagnosed with breast cancer. Del throws his back out and isn’t always available. New detective Gonzalez acts suspiciously, snooping in other detective’s computers and lying about what happened with Faz when she shot the suspect.

The characters are interesting, and the plot kept me reading.

Ann Cleeves — Wild Fire

This novel is my introduction to a well-known mystery writer. Jumping into the last book of Ann Cleeves’ Shetland Island series with DI Jimmy Perez, I found the story easy to read as a stand-alone and will likely go back and read more of her work.

The author’s depiction of the setting makes me want to visit the small village on a remote island in the far north UK. The characters are equally well defined. A family has moved to the island from London, in part to provide a better life for their two children. Christopher, their autistic son who has a liking for fire, is one of the main characters in the story. He finds the body of a neighbor’s nanny hanging from the rafters of their shed, where the previous owner of their home committed suicide.

The mystery stays unsolved until the end. The suspects are many, beginning with the family and including a bitter town gossip who becomes the next murder victim.

I would recommend this well-written book to anyone who loves a good mystery.