Category Archives: mystery

David Carlson — Let the Dead Bury the Dead

A Christopher Worthy and Father Fortis Mystery. The story feels a bit like a “cozy” mystery to me — amateur sleuth solving crime in a small town. Father Fortis, a Greek Orthodox monk, is the amateur sleuth who helps his friend, Police Lieutenant Christopher Worthy, solve the murder of a priest. The church community, even though in the city of Detroit, functions as a small town.

Worthy believes the killer is someone in the congregation. His nemesis on the police force, who continually interferes in the case, believes it‘s some punk from the projects close to the church—a robbery gone bad. Worthy and Father Fortis track down and interview several parishioners who appear to have motives for killing the priest. They are also searching for the priest’s journal, which they believe may hold clues.

At the same time, Worthy is trying to reestablish ties with his teenage daughter and attempting to understand his surly new police partner. The characters and interactions between them are interesting and add to the story.

The novel keeps a slower pace than many of the mysteries and thrillers in today’s market. But I enjoyed the story and kept reading.

Joanne Harris — Different Class

Something bad happened at St. Oswald’s boys’ school twenty-four years ago. What was it and who was responsible? Different Class is a British literary, psychological suspense story, which takes place in 1981 and 2005. This novel reveals many secrets slowly. More than once, you think you know what happened, only to find out you’re wrong.

Roy Straightly has been the school’s Latin master for thirty years. One of his least favorite students from 1981 returns to the school as headmaster to bring the old institution into the 21st century. Straightly resists in every possible way.

The point of view in 2005 is mostly Straightly’s, and we see the events of 1981 mainly through a journal of an unknown student. The novel started a bit slow, and I almost stopped reading. But the unanswered questions and suspense kept me reading, and the more I read, the more I enjoyed it. In addition to the twists and turns and suspense, Harris throws in dark humor, murder, and underlying themes about class differences, friendships,  revenge, and acceptance of others.

A very good read.

Barry Eisler — Zero Sum

I’m not sure why I keep reading Eisler’s John Rain novels. Rain is a brutal assassin and the author delves into his mind, examining the details when Rain thinks about killing. And the sex scenes are heavy-duty, much more than I need to read. I didn’t finish the last two books I started because they were too “macho mail.” Yet Eisler keeps me reading to the end. He’s an excellent writer.Tokyo

Rain is half Japanese, half American. His childhood was split between Japan and the States, and he doesn’t feel accepted in either country. In Zero Sum, Rain has returned to Tokyo in 1982 after a few years in the Philippines. Even though I’ve never been there, his descriptions of Tokyo are so vivid that I feel as if I would recognize it if I visited the city.

If you like well-written psychological thrillers and anti-heroes, read this book.

Ace Atkins — Robert B. Parker’s Little White Lies

If you are a fan of Robert B. Parker, you probably know that his estate selected Ace Atkins to continue the Spenser series of novels. I liked Parker’s writing, but Little White Lies is the first Ace Atkins novel I’ve read. I enjoyed the trip through my favorite city of Boston and the flashback to the TV series, Spenser for Hire with Spenser and Hawk, from the 1980s.

Spenser’s client, Connie Kelly, referred to him by his psychiatrist girlfriend, wants him to find M. Brooks Wells who conned her out of almost three hundred thousand dollars and then disappeared. Spenser finds that Wells’ claims of ex-Navy Seal, ex-CIA, etc. are all fiction. The ATF is also after Brooks, trying to connect the dots in a gun-running case. Connie Kelly follows Brooks to Georgia and is shot. Suicide or murder? Spenser and Hawk catch up with Wells  preaching in a popular church. They work trying to prove Brooks murdered Kelly and to unravel the gun-running ring.

It didn’t feel quite like a Parker novel. But it’s been a few years since I read one, and my memory might be faulty.

John Farrow — Perish the Day

John Farrow is a previously unknown author for me. I enjoyed the story, the characters, the setting (a New Hampshire campus at graduation time), and the twisted plot of three seemingly unrelated murders.

The way several law enforcement agencies worked together and allowed an outsider, a Canadian retired detective, to help with the investigation seemed outside the realm of reality. But it worked.

I will look for more books by this author. He also writes under the name of Trevor Ferguson.

New Hampshire college town
New Hampshire college town

Carl Hiaasen — Tourist Season

Carl Hiaasen writes black humor about Florida. Tourist Season is one of his earlier books written in 1986.

It’s obvious to me that Hiaasen loves Florida but not necessarily the developers and the tourists. The villain in Tourist Season, Skip Wiley, is a columnist for the Miami Sun who feels the same as the author about Florida, but more vehemently. He goes over the edge of sanity and forms a rag-tag band of terrorists made up of crazy Cuban, a Seminole, and a black ex-football player. They commit kidnappings, bombings, and murder to create headlines that will send the tourists and developers back north and leave Florida to the wildlife.

Brian Keyes is a reporter turned private investigator. He is hired to find a couple of missing persons (kidnapped and disposed of by the terrorists), then hired by the editor of the Sun to find Wiley, and finally hired as a bodyguard for the Orange Bowl queen.

The book is filled with murder, mayhem, and lots of humor. I thoroughly enjoy reading Hiaasen.

Dennis Lehane — Since We Fell

I met Dennis Lehane once at a book signing in Boston and I’ve seen him on television a few times. He seems like an easygoing likeable person with a twinkle of humor in his eyes. But Lehane writes dark stories. His characters are twisted. He examines his characters minds good and bad—their delights, doubts, and demons. Great stuff!

The first part of Since We Fell follows Rachel Childs from a childhood with a dominating mother and no father, through a successful career as a journalist in Boston and an unsuccessful marriage, to a breakdown on camera in Haiti while covering the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake. Her husband leaves her, she’s fired from her job, and she becomes a virtual shut-in.

Enter second husband, Brian Delacroix, who understands her (unlike first husband), treats her with loving kindness, and helps her overcome her phobias. Perfect husband…or is he?

The story is filled with questions, conspiracies, murder, and surprises. Is it a psychological thriller, a literary novel, crime novel, or something that doesn’t fall into any genre or category? It fits all three of my classifications of head, heart, and even some humor.

Charles River, Boston
Charles River, Boston

The setting is mostly in Boston, my favorite city in the world. It made me feel at home.

In my opinion, Dennis Lehane is one of the today’s best authors.

Stephen King — Duma Key

Duma Key is the first Stephen King novel I’ve read in many years. Even though he is an excellent writer, I’m not a fan of horror. You usually find his books classified as horror, but they could also fall into thriller, suspense, fantasy, psychological, supernatural, paranormal, ghost story, and mystery genres. Duma Key is all of these.

I’m not sure why I decided to read this book; maybe because the setting is in Southwest Florida where I live. I found the story intriguing from the beginning. Edgar Freemantle, builder and contractor, is almost killed in an accident that damages his right hip and leg, crushes his skull, and he loses his right arm. Due to his unpredictable behavior while recovering, his wife leaves him.

His shrink suggests Edgar should take up a hobby and go on sabbatical. He leases “Big Pink,” a house hanging over the water at the edge of the Gulf of Mexico on Duma Key. Here he begins to draw and then paint, learning at a furious pace. His ghost arm drives him.

Walking the beach, Edgar meets Wireman, and they become friends. Wireman is caretaker for an old woman, Elizabeth Eastlake, who floats in and out of dementia. Elizabeth owns the habitable part of Duma Key, including Big Pink, and she is an integral part of the story.

The story begins as psychological and/or supernatural thriller, moving on to become a ghost story. It doesn’t become a “horror story/monster movie” until about three-quarters of the way through. By that time it had me hooked, and I had to keep reading to see what would happen. Edgar, Wireman, and Jack (who was hired to help Edgar and became his friend) join forces to battle the monsters.

As I said at the beginning, Stephen King is an excellent writer.

Kim Stanley Robinson — 2312

I picked this book to read because I was delighted with Robinson’s New York 2140. I wanted to read more. But there is no connection between the two novels except the author.

For me, the best part of this book was the settings. It starts with a sunrise on planet Mercury. The descriptions are breath-taking. The author continues to give us imaginative pictures of and from other places in our solar system throughout the book. It must have required tons of research combined with an ingenious imagination to create these scenes.

There are four (or five) principal characters. Swan is an artist from Mercury. She designed worlds and created habitats in moons and asteroids. Her grandmother Alex, who was the leader of Mercury and more, has died, and Swan is mourning. Swan is volatile, angry, hyper…and 135 years old. She meets Wahram, a diplomat from the Saturn system, whose personality is the complete opposite—relaxed, accepting, enjoying life. Inspector Genette is an interplanetary policeman. Kiran is a young man from Earth who helps Swan. She, in turn, helps him leave Earth and immigrate to Venus. The fifth main character is Pauline, the cube (quantum computer) in Swan’s head. There are many other characters scattered through the book, but I believe these are the central cast.

The intricate plot twists and turns. Earth is in bad shape with political and environmental issues. It is the only planet in the solar system still struggling with poverty and social inequality. Swan and Wahram are trying to fix it with successes and failures. Someone tries to destroy Terminator, the city on Mercury, but most of the people escape. An asteroid habitat was destroyed previously, and all inhabitants died. These events appear to be related. Was Alex’s death murder or natural causes? Swan and Wahram work with Genette trying to find who is responsible for these disasters.

I could go on, but you should read the book. It’s long, but you could skip the extracts and lists and get the whole story. I recommend you read everything. Those extracts give history, explanations, and descriptions that enhance the story.

William Kent Kruger — Manitou Canyon

The story takes place in the Boundary Waters on the border of Minnesota and Canada in cold, raw, November. A man disappears from the middle of a lake, leaving behind an empty canoe and no sign of what happened to him or where he could have gone.

When the official search is called off, ex-Sheriff Cork O’Connor is asked by the man’s niece and nephew to keep looking. Even though Cork’s daughter’s wedding is approaching and the weather is threatening, Cork takes the job. When he doesn’t return and doesn’t call in for several days, his family and the current sheriff go looking for him in a float plane.

The story is full of gloom—the season, the weather, and Cork’s mood. He despises November; all bad things in his life have happened in November. He doesn’t understand why his daughter has planned a wedding in this gloomy month. But there is much warmth in the story, too—the connections between family and friends working together and even between the good guys and the bad guys. The author looks closely at the motivations of all the characters. Much of the mystery of this book is the “why” of what’s happening.

Interwoven throughout the novel is Native American lore and spirituality. It adds depth to an already interesting read.